Darren Buford

Winter Walking

News Note

Maintaining your exercise regimen during the autumn and winter months can be difficult. It’s easy to stockpile a list of excuses — “the days are too short,” “it’s too cold outside,” etc. But one of the simplest and most cost-effective ways to stay healthy is by walking. Equipped with a pair of walking shoes (yes, they are different than running shoes) and a pedometer (a great motivating tool), you can easily track your daily progress as you burn extra calories (approximately 100 per mile).

Almonds — We’re Lovin’ ‘Em

News Note

According to the Journal Environmental Nutrition, eating almonds may help lower low-density lipoproteins (LDL, or “bad” cholesterol) and help decrease systolic blood pressure. Almonds are also an excellent source for magnesium, vitamin E, protein, fiber, copper, calcium, zinc, and potassium. But if you decide to add this extraordinary nut to your diet, keep your daily intake in check. Adding almonds to your current diet might yield a slight weight gain because they are a concentrated source of fat and calories.

Tea Teeth

News Note

The growing selection of teas in your grocer’s aisles reveal Americans are consuming a larger amount of this comforting drink than ever before. And with the mounting evidence of the benefits of green, oolong, and white teas, who can blame them? But according to the Journal of Dentistry, while many teas contain powerful antioxidants, other varieties, specifically those that have fruit acids such as lemon, may also be eroding enamel.

Cocoa Keeps the Doctor Away

News Note

As the days become colder and there’s a tendency to want to bundle up next to a warm fire with a cup of hot cocoa, isn’t it nice to know that this liquid concoction can help stave off disease? According to researchers from Cornell University, cocoa contains antioxidants that can help protect against heart disease and cancer. In fact, the amount of phenols and flavonoids in one cup of hot cocoa contains more antioxidant power than red wine, green tea, or black tea.

Easing Surgery Concerns

News Note

"Stressed-out” and “anxiety-ridden” might describe a mother’s emotions when her child is scheduled for surgery. But according to researchers from Yale University, that uneasiness may be lessened through auricular acupuncture. This technique incorporates the use of needles or scopes on specific points along the outer ear thought to directly influence brain patterns. Of the 66 women who participated in the study, more than half received the treatment 30 minutes before their children’s surgery, while the control group received sham acupuncture.

Senior Site

News Note

A new website (www.nihseniorhealth.gov) created by the National Institutes of Health focuses on information specifically for those 60 and over, including age-specific topics such as arthritis, balance problems, hearing loss, and Alzheimer’s disease. Besides addressing these issues, this free site uniquely accommodates the physical challenges senior citizens face.

Iron (Wo)man

News Note

Nearly one-fifth of North American women do not get their recommended daily allowance of iron, over time possibly resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Many women are prone to IDA because of their body’s inability to properly absorb iron from foods like red meat. Vegetarians and vegans are particularly susceptible without a proper understanding of what foods, other than meat, can provide high amounts of iron.

Massage for Low Back Pain

News Note

A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that massage, as well as chiropractic work, offered equally beneficial results for low back pain as physical therapy and pain medication. By reviewing the results from three separate studies, researchers were also able to conclude that massage and spinal manipulation relieved pain better than acupuncture, other nondrug relaxation techniques, and a fake laser procedure.

Breast Health and Exercise

News Note

The benefits of exercise for cutting the risks of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes are well-documented. But according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, add breast health to the list. In a study of more than 74,000 postmenopausal women, those of normal weight who exercised 75 minutes to 10 hours a week cut their chances of developing breast cancer by 30 percent to 37 percent, respectively.

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