Heart Disease

Water Works

News Note

Besides decreasing headaches, heartburn, constipation, fatigue and kidney stones, getting your fair share of water each day may help prevent serious illnesses including heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer and asthma. One study at the University of Loma Linda, California, showed that people who drink five or more glasses of water every day cut their risk of suffering a fatal heart attack in half. Researchers believe because water, unlike other beverages, is absorbed immediately into the blood stream, it thins the blood and reduces clot risk.

Short Steps to Health

News Note

Frequent spurts of intense activity, such as taking the stairs or walking rather than driving, may cut your risk of heart disease by as much as one-third. In a recent study published by physicians at the University of Ulster in Belfast, a group of 12 women, ages 18–22, exhibited a significant increase in their health and fitness levels after just seven weeks of climbing stairs two minutes per day, five days a week.

Hearts & Flowers

News Note

A gift of roses has always been considered the way to a woman’s heart, but growing roses may prove to be a more heart-healthy approach. In the Archives of Internal Medicine, April 2000, researchers reported evidence that 60 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity, such as gardening, lowers heart attack risk by 66 percent. The conclusions were drawn from a study involving 333 heart attack patients, as compared with 503 subjects who had not experienced heart attacks.

Sedentary Death Syndrome

News Note

It’s no secret many Americans are overweight. But many in danger of obesity do not realize the severity of their situation. Rates for chronic diseases due to physical inactivity, such as heart disease, have increased dramatically. Many physiologists are labeling the epidemic related to sedentary behavior and its relationship to chronic, preventable diseases as Sedentary Death Syndrome (SeDs). Researchers warn that more than 60 percent of all Americans are currently at risk for SeDs.

French Paradox

News Note

French cuisine is world-renowned as some of the best and most rich food in the world. It comes as a shock then that there is much less heart disease in France than in the United States. A University of Washington study suggests the broader array of foods in the French diet is more likely to include representation from each of the five food groups than the typical American diet, which includes a less varied menu.